Larropsis

Belongs within: Larrini. Larropsis: letting your prey do the work for you Published 12 June 2024 Keen-eyed wanderers in sandier regions of North America may observe wasps of the family Crabronidae going about their business, visiting flowers and hunting prey with which to stock their nests. Among the members of this family unique to this… Continue reading Larropsis

Hackeriapis

Belongs within: Megachilini. Hackeriapis is an Australasian genus of relatively small resin bees, most of which (excepting some larger species) have strong transverse grooves on the second and third metasomal tergites (Michener 1965). Resinous confusion Published 12 February 2024 Australia (like most other parts of the world) is home to a wide diversity of solitary… Continue reading Hackeriapis

Halictidae

Belongs within: Anthophila.Contains: Halictinae, Nomia, Lipotriches. The Halictidae are a family of short-tongued bees distinguished by a strongly arcuate basal vein in the fore wing (Engel 2001). The Halictidae: short tongues and waxy chambers Published 25 April 2020 In an earlier post, I introduced you to the diverse group of bees known as the Halictinae.… Continue reading Halictidae

Anthophila

Belongs within: Apoidea.Contains: Megachilidae, Apidae, Andrenidae, Halictidae, Stenotritidae, Colletidae, Melittinae. The Anthophila, bees, are a diverse and well-marked clade of herbivorous wasps, characterised primarily by the presence of at least some plumose hairs on the body (though these may be few in some groups). Particularly dense patches of these plumose hairs may form a scopa… Continue reading Anthophila

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Categorised as Anthophila

Lasioglossum

Belongs within: Halictinae. Lasioglossum is a cosmopolitan genus of small bees characterised by weakened cross-veins in the outer part of the fore wing, and by relatively small and simple gonostyli in the male (Houston 2018). <==Lasioglossum Curtis 1833 [Gastrohalictini]M65 | i. s.: L. albipesJB13 | L. anomalum (Robertson 1892) [=Halictus anomalus]M65 | L. coriaceumE00 |… Continue reading Lasioglossum

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Categorised as Anthophila

Halictinae

Belongs within: Halictidae.Contains: Augochlorini, Homalictus, Lasioglossum, Halictus, Sphecodes. The Halictinae are a group of short-tongued bees commonly known as ‘sweat bees’, due to their habit of lapping perspiration from animals in order to collect salts. They are distinguished from other bees by the combination of a strong episternal groove continuing well below the level of… Continue reading Halictinae

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Categorised as Anthophila

Halictus

Belongs within: Halictinae. Halictus is a widespread genus of halictine bees with strong distal veins in the fore wing. <==Halictus Latreille 1804 [Halictina]E01 |–H. abnormis Blüthgen 1926B26 |–H. acrocephalus Blüthgen 1926B26 |–H. aeratusMS01 |–H. aglyphusB26 |–H. albescens Sm. 1853 (see below for synonymy)B26 | |–H. a. albescensB26 | |–H. a. gibber Vachal 1892B26 | |–H.… Continue reading Halictus

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Categorised as Anthophila

Homalictus

Belongs within: Halictinae. Homalictus is an Indo-Australian genus of small bees with a somewhat flattened metasoma bearing a ventral scopa of relatively long hairs (Michener 1965). Characters (from Michener 1965): Small species, metallic in nearly all females and most males. Labral process of female tapering to a point, its keel commonly depressed and broad above… Continue reading Homalictus

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Categorised as Anthophila

Nomia

Belongs within: Halictidae. Nomia is a genus of bees whose species excavate nests in soil (Michener 1965). Many species have prominent, apical opalescent bands on the metasomal tergites. Characters (from Michener 1965): First flagellar segment shorter than scape; proboscis with apices of galeae in repose not reaching posterior end of proboscidial fossa; mesepisternum with distinct… Continue reading Nomia

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Categorised as Anthophila

Andrenidae

Belongs within: Anthophila.Contains: Andrena. The Andrenidae are a family of short-tongued bees that nest in soil, found on all continents except Australia and Antarctica. They are characterised by the presence of two subantennal sutures below each antenna, which are usually not convergent below. Members of the subfamily Andreninae are most diverse in Eurasia and North… Continue reading Andrenidae

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Categorised as Anthophila