Gompholobium

Gompholobium cf. capitatum, copyright Jan Thomas Johansson.

Belongs within: Mirbelieae.

Gompholobium, glory peas, is an Australian genus of leguminous shrubs commonly bearing trifoliolate leaves with narrow leaflets. Pods are more or less swollen, sometimes even globose.

Characters (from New South Wales Flora Online): Shrubs. Leaves alternate, either simple, 3-foliolate, palmate or pinnate with the terminal leaflet sessile; leaflets usually narrow, margins entire; stipules small or absent. Inflorescences terminal, or rarely axillary, racemes, sometimes reduced to 1 or 2 flowers; bracts usually small, lanceolate; bracteoles small, lanceolate or bristly, inserted more or less below the base of the calyx or absent. Calyx tube more or less short, the teeth lanceolate, more or less equal, longer than tube. Petals shortly clawed; standard circular to reniform, larger than the other petals; wings oblong, more or less falcate; keel obtuse, slightly broader than wings. Stamens free. Ovary glabrous, sessile or shortly stipitate; ovules 2–many; style incurved or filiform. Pod turgid, more or less globose to obliquely oblong; seeds without an aril.

<==Gompholobium
    |--G. aristatumGK00
    |--G. burtonioidesGK00
    |--G. capitatumGK00
    |--G. confertumGK00
    |--G. ecostatumB00
    |--G. glabratumH87a
    |--G. gompholobioidesG04
    |--G. grandiflorumH87a
    |--G. huegeliiH87b
    |--G. karijiniMLP09
    |--G. knightianumGK00
    |--G. marginatumOS04
    |--G. minusCP13
    |--G. ovatumGK00
    |--G. pinnatumH87a
    |--G. polymorphumGK00
    |--G. polyzygumEF04
    |--G. preissiiRL05
    |--G. scabrumGK00
    |--G. subulatumLK14
    |--G. tomentosumOS04
    |--G. uncinatumB96
    `--G. viscidulumG04

*Type species of generic name indicated

References

[B96] Baker, R. T. 1896. On the botany of Rylstone and the Goulburn River districts. Part I. Proceedings of the Linnean Society of New South Wales 21 (3): 427–466.

[B00] Braby, M. F. 2000. Butterflies of Australia: their identification, biology and distribution vol. 2. CSIRO Publishing: Collingwood (Victoria).

[CP13] Cardoso, D., R. T. Pennington, L. P. de Queiroz, J. S. Boatwright, B.-E. Van Wyk, M. F. Wojciechowski & M. Lavin. 2013. Reconstructing the deep-branching relationships of the papilionoid legumes. South African Journal of Botany 89: 58–75.

[EF04] Etten, E. J. B. van, & J. E. D. Fox. 2004. Vegetation classification and ordination of the central Hamersley Ranges, Western Australia. Journal of the Royal Society of Western Australia 87 (2): 63–79.

[G04] Gibson, N. 2004. Flora and vegetation of the Eastern Goldfields Ranges: part 7. Middle and South Ironcap, Digger Rock and Hatter Hill. Journal of the Royal Society of Western Australia 87 (2): 49–62.

[GK00] Gibson, N., & G. J. Keighery. 2000. Flora and vegetation of the Byenup-Muir reserve system, south-west Western Australia. CALMScience 3 (3): 323–402.

[H87a] Haviland, E. 1887a. Flowering seasons of Australian plants. No. I—List of plants indigenous in the neighbourhood of Sydney, flowering during July. Proceedings of the Linnean Society of New South Wales, series 2, 1 (4): 1049–1051.

[H87b] Haviland, E. 1887b. Flowering seasons of Australian plants. No. II. Proceedings of the Linnean Society of New South Wales, series 2, 1 (4): 1103–1104.

[LK14] Lyons, M. N., G. J. Keighery, L. A. Gibson & T. Handasyde. 2014. Flora and vegetation communities of selected islands off the Kimberley coast of Western Australia. Records of the Western Australian Museum Supplement 81: 205–244.

[MLP09] McKenzie, N. L., S. van Leeuwen & A. M. Pinder. 2009. Introduction to the Pilbara Biodiversity Survey, 2002–2007. Records of the Western Australian Museum Supplement 78 (1): 3–89.

[OS04] Obbens, F. J., & L. W. Sage. 2004. Vegetation and flora of a diverse upland remnant of the Western Australian wheatbelt (Nature Reserve A21064). Journal of the Royal Society of Western Australia 87 (1): 19–28.

[RL05] Rafferty, C., & B. B. Lamont. 2005. Selective feeding by macropods on vegetation regenerating following fire. Journal of the Royal Society of Western Australia 88 (4): 155–165.

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